About the Levy

  • Key Accomplishments & Outcomes
    12 years of success and impact in our community.

    35,000 people served every year by the Veterans and Human Services Levy (VHSL) since 2012.


    2,056 units of affordable housing created since 2006 with VHSL funding, with more to open before the current levy expires on December 31, 2017.


    15,000 counseling hours provided to veterans and their family members since 2012 for post-traumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma, or other conditions.


    $27,963 average increase in household income seen by the 128 veterans who received training and job placement in 2016 through the levy-funded King County Veterans Program.


    $7 million saved since 2012 by stabilizing an average of 780 clients each year, reducing their emergency medical and criminal justice involvement and avoiding costly crisis services.


    800 people experiencing or at risk of homelessness helped every year by the VHSL to gain or maintain housing, on average.


    3,000 veterans and others in need identified and connected to housing, health care, and employment resources by levy-funded outreach programs since 2006.


    At least 875 residents of King County who are experiencing homelessness or are at-risk access health and behavioral health services through Mobile Medical Van every year. Mobile Medical Van, Public Health-Seattle & King County’s well-known and successful program that serves residents who would otherwise not have received health care or would have waited until they needed emergency services, began as a VHSL program.


    12,500 moms screened for maternal depression at integrated behavioral health and community health centers, with treatment services provided to more than 523 mothers annually who screen positive for depression to promote successful parenting and the improvement of the health of mothers and their children.


  • Benefits
    If approved by voters, the new property tax levy will:

    Expand King County’s commitment to veterans and their families.

    • Build on the current levy’s successful veterans employment programs that capitalize on the skills veterans bring from their service
    • Increase access to legal services that assist veterans in accessing their earned benefits
    • Create housing and coordination centers with supportive services for veterans

    Expand King County’s commitment to our community’s most vulnerable individuals and families, providing connections to services that restore health and build self-sufficiency.

    • Increase system-connected housing that promotes recovery and reentry by preventing people from discharging from treatment settings or releasing from incarceration into homelessness
    • Increase access to legal and housing resources for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault
    • Provide new mobile medical vans to increase access to essential services for isolated, homebound or homeless persons across King County
    • Support individuals with disabilities and their caregivers in building community participation and inclusion

    Support seniors, the fastest-growing segment of King County’s population, and their unpaid caregivers.

    • Prevent seniors from aging into poverty by creating and expanding housing programs and providing tax relief to low-income seniors
    • Support Meals on Wheels and other food programs for low-income seniors
    • Invest in senior centers county-wide by helping to fund senior activities and programs that promote physical, social, and emotional health

  • Cost
    10¢ per $1,000 of assessed home value.

    The Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy will cost $28 more per year ($2.33/month) for the typical King County homeowner. This estimate is based on the current median King County home value of $450,000.


    The levy will raise $350 million over six years to help veterans, active duty service members and their families, seniors, individuals and families experiencing homelessness, and others in need.


    The levy will expand property tax exemptions and offer rebates to eligible low-income seniors, seniors with a disability, and 100% service-connected disabled veterans.


  • Accountability

    Performance Measurement & Evaluation

    The Veterans and Human Services Levy produces annual and mid-year financial and performance reports to account for all levy expenditures and measure how each levy activity performs against its goals. See www.kingcounty.gov/VHSL-Reports.

    Citizen Oversight

    Citizen input and oversight will continue with the new levy. In addition to the boards focused on veterans and regional human services, a new Healthy Aging Advisory Board has been proposed to provide oversight for the older adults element of the new levy. Current board meetings and materials are online at www.kingcounty.gov/VHSL.

Endorsements

  • AARP WA
  • Aerospace Machinists 751
  • AFT Washington, AFL-CIO
  • Aging and Disability Services Advisory Council, King County
  • Beacon Development Group
  • Capitol Hill Housing Foundation
  • Catholic Community Services of King County
  • Church Council of Greater Seattle
  • City of Kirkland
  • City of Lake Forest Park
  • Civic Ventures
  • Coalition Ending Gender-Based Violence
  • Compass Housing Alliance
  • Crisis Clinic
  • Downtown Emergency Service Center
  • Downtown Seattle Association
  • Eastside Legal Assistance Program
  • Edge Developers
  • El Centro de la Raza
  • Equal Justice Coalition
  • Faith Action Network WA
  • Friends of Youth
  • FUSE WA
  • Habitat for Humanity Seattle-King County
  • Housing Development Consortium
  • InterIm Community Development Association
  • Kent Youth and Family Services
  • King County Alliance for Human Services
  • King County Democrats
  • King County Veterans Consortium
  • LifeWire
  • Martin Luther King County Labor Council
  • Navos
  • Plymouth Housing Group
  • OARS for Women Veterans
  • Organization for Prostitution Survivors
  • SAGE Architectural Alliance
  • Schemata Workshop
  • Seattle Community Law Center
  • Seattle Human Services Coalition
  • Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness
  • SEIU 775
  • SEIU 1199
  • Sight Connection
  • Skyway Solutions
  • Sno-Valley Senior Center
  • Sound Generations
  • Southwest Youth & Family Services
  • The Seattle Times
  • The Sophia Way
  • The Sound Alliance
  • The Stranger
  • 34th LD Democrats
  • 36th LD Democrats
  • 37th LD Democrats
  • Tonkin Architecture
  • United Way of King County
  • WA Low Income Housing Alliance
  • WA State Senior Citizens’ Lobby
  • YouthCare
  • YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What will the levy do?

    The levy expands our commitment to strengthening communities by providing vital services like job training, employment opportunities, and housing stability to veterans, seniors, domestic violence survivors, and more. The levy extends existing efforts that have proven effective in reducing unemployment, homelessness, and emergency medical costs. Additional information can be found at the King County VSHSL web page.

  • How much will the levy cost me?

    The Veterans, Seniors and Human Services Levy will cost homeowners 10 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value (approximately $28 more per year for a $450,000 home, or $2.33 per month). This will generate approximately $350 million over six years that will strengthen our community through empowering veterans, seniors, domestic violence survivors, and more.

  • How do we know the levy works?

    The original levy was passed in 2005 and renewed in 2011. It has been proven to work. Here are just a few of the ‘05 and ‘11 levies’ achievements:

    • 35,000 people served every year since 2012

    • 2,056 units of affordable housing funded since 2006

    • 15,000 counseling hours provided to veterans and their family members since 2012

    • $27,963 average increase in household income for 128 veterans who received training and job placement in 2016
    • $7 million saved since 2012 by stabilizing an average of 780 clients each year, reducing their emergency medical and criminal justice involvement and avoiding costly crisis services
    • 800 people per year helped with housing stability
    • 3,000 veterans and others in need identified and connected to housing, healthcare, employment resources by levy-funded outreach programs every year
    • 12,500 moms screened for maternal depression at integrated behavioral health/community health centers, with treatment services provided to more than 523 mothers annually who screened positive for depression
    • Mobile Medical Van, Public Health-Seattle & King County’s well-known and successful program began as a VHSL program. Every year, it brings health and behavioral health services to more than 875 homeless or at-risk residents who would otherwise not have received health care or waited until they needed emergency services
  • How can I register to vote or change my home address?

    Please click here to register to vote in King County.

  • When is election day?

    Election day is Tuesday, November 7. Ballots will be mailed to all registered voters on October 18 – please keep on the look-out for the ballots to arrive in your mail box!

  • How can I volunteer or learn more?

    Please click here to email the Yes On Prop 1 campaign.